1. Essere un libro non basta

    www.federiconovaro.eu

     
  2. ■ infn ■ →  #lgbtq→ @adelphiedizioni #auden (1)

    ”[…] Perché leggere Auden? Per un tentativo di riconciliazione con noi stessi, tra il nostro mondo interiore – che a volte si rivela un deserto- e ciò che ci circonda, gli affetti, la Storia, la Natura. Perché la parola è l’unica medicina che può guarire la mente offesa; insegnamento che la sua generazione trasse dalla lettura di Freud. […]

    (dalla recensione di Federico Boccaccini a Grazie, nebbia, di W. H. Auden, Adelphi 2011)


     
  3. ■ infn ■ → #AlanBennet  @adelphiedizioni  #LGBTQ (3)

    (in occasione della segnalazione su FN de Gli studenti di storia, di Alan Bennett, nella versione italiana di Mariagrazie Gini, Adelphi 2012)

    (via iwearastetsonnow)

     
  4. ■ infn ■ → #AlanBennet  @adelphiedizioni  #LGBTQ (2)

    angelophile:

    Pass the parcel.
    Sometimes that’s all you can do.
    Take it. Feel it. And pass it on.
    Not for me.
    Not for you.
    But for someone. Somewhere.
    One day.
    Pass it on boys! That’s the game I want you to learn.
    Pass it on!


    The History Boys (2006)

    (in occasione della segnalazione su FN de Gli studenti di storia, di Alan Bennett, nella versione italiana di Mariagrazie Gini, Adelphi 2012)

     
  5. ■ infn ■ → #AlanBennet  @adelphiedizioni  #LGBTQ (1)

    Gli studenti di storia
    (The History Boys)
    di Alan Bennett

    in capo al testo: Introduzione; Commento alla prima produzione, di Alan Bennett
    traduzione di Mariagrazia Gini
    [responsabilità grafiche non indicate]

    178 p. ; 12€ | cartaceo
    Adelphi – Piccola Biblioteca Adelphi 625, Milano 2012

    (in occasione della segnalazione su FN di Gli studenti di storia, di Alan Bennett, Adelphi 2012)

     
  6. ■ infn ■ → #Harbach (10 e fine) @RizzoliST #LGBTQ

    booksandpixels:

    From the aforementioned Vanity Fair feature a look at different proposals for the US jacket (including the striking final blue version). Also, the different Italian versions up to the last one (which is our take on the American one).

    (in occasione della segnalazione su FN de L’arte di vivere in difesa, di Chad Harbach, Rizzoli 2012)

     
  7. ■ infn ■ → #Harbach (9) #LGBTQ

    bookloop:

    The Art of Fielding, by Chad Harbach

    (in occasione della segnalazione su FN de L’arte di vivere in difesa, di Chad Harbach, Rizzoli 2012)

     
  8. ■ infn ■ → #Harbach (8) #LGBTQ

    cookingthebooksshow:

    We got the protein bar recipe from here.  They lingered in the fridge for a while, I’ll be honest. But we definitely undercooked them.

    I’m a big fan of both Chad and The Art Of Fielding and I recommend the book without reservation, even to people who are not fans of baseball or sports or college or whatever else the book is “about.”  As Chad says, it is a book about love.

    And shopping for jeans, and protein powder, and an impromptu burial at sea, and having sex with your boyfriend’s best friend just to cheer him up.  But mostly love!

    Also this is the last Cooking the Books, which is pretty sad.  I moved to a new apartment and the kitchen is too small to accommodate the camera crew.  Val and Andrew are heavenly angels for all their hours of hard work on this show.  We made memories we’ll cherish forever, and also $198.49 from blip.tv.  (Dinner’s on me, guys. Seriously. Let’s do it.  Let’s go out to dinner and spend exactly $198.49).

    (in occasione della segnalazione su FN de L’arte di vivere in difesa, di Chad Harbach, Rizzoli 2012)

     
     

  9. ■ infn ■ → #Harbach (7) #LGBTQ

    shhhimreading:

    Baseball Diamond

    Is it possible to talk about Chad Harbach’s novel The Art of Fielding without addressing the significant advance or the panting anticipation leading up to the Fall season or the way that publishers fell all over themselves trying to sign him and then, how he went with Little Brown

    (in occasione della segnalazione su FN de L’arte di vivere in difesa, di Chad Harbach, Rizzoli 2012)

    (via shhhimreading-deactivated201211)

     
  10. ■ infn ■ → #Harbach (6) #LGBTQ

    littlejoeii:

    On the left, the UK cover of The Art of Fielding. On the right, the US cover. 

    Amazon.co.uk could get the book on the left to me in a few days time for just over £10. Speedier yet, I could take the tube into town and get it (the book on the left) from a real-world bookstore - make a day of it! - and have it by my bedside this time tomorrow for around £14, factoring in travel costs and the bottle of water I’d have to buy to sit in Foyles cafe for most of the day. That would be good. Their wi-fi can be a be flakey but it’s one of my favourite haunts and a good place to read. 

    Instead I’ve got a amazon.com tab open in chrome and have worked out that for the not-at-all-as-expensive-as-I-was-expecting price of £14.60 I can have the US cover, that pretty one on the right, in my arms sometime during the estimated delivery window of Jan. 26, 2012 - Feb. 15, 2012. 

    Easy decision, right? In the meantime I can just order Swamplandia to scratch my 2011 lit itch.

    (in occasione della segnalazione su FN de L’arte di vivere in difesa, di Chad Harbach, Rizzoli 2012)

     

  11. ■ infn ■ → #Harbach (5) #LGBTQ

    The Art of Fielding combines three of my favorite things: baseball, Moby Dick, and queers. First, and most obviously, the book is about baseball—specifically, about a college baseball team. The book follows a trio of baseball players at Westish College, a liberal arts college in Wisconsin, through their college careers. I’ve read a few reviews that, I think in an attempt to make the book appeal to a larger audience, claim the book isn’t really about baseball, but I think that does it a disservice. True, you probably don’t need to like baseball to enjoy the book; but for someone like me who loves the sport, it makes the book that much better. It has some really lovely passages about the beauty of the game, as well as a truly excruciating depiction of a player losing his game psychologically (Chuck Knoblauch has always been my go-to reference for this phenomenon, but I learned in this book that it’s more commonly referred to as Steve Blass Disease).

    The baseball team is called The Harpooners and Herman Melville serves as a sort of a mascot—or at least tourist attraction—for the town Westish is located in due to the fact that he once gave a lecture there. There’s a Melville statue on campus, and the president of the college, Guert Affenlight, made a name for himself as a Melville scholar with a book called The Sperm-Squeezers. The Art of Fielding has a lot of explicit Moby Dick references like this, but it also shares a lot with it thematically. You’ve got the monomaniacal drive towards something; a group of men from disparate backgrounds working together. Harbach, in this review, puts it like this:

    The Art of Fielding is in large part a book about the varieties of male friendship, from the antagonistic and the competitive to the deeply affectionate and the frankly sexual, and so Moby-Dick, taking place as it does in a very intense world of very intense men, seemed like the ideal analogue. A baseball team is a lot like a whaling ship: in each case, a group of men who might otherwise have little in common spend an inordinate amount of time in close and not-so-comfortable quarters, excluding the world, in pursuit of a common goal.

    Finally, the queers. One of the subplots of the book deals with president Affenlight falling for one of the (male) baseball players. Affenlight had been straight his whole life, up until he meets this man, and one of the things I really liked about this book was how it portrayed with that. Neither Affenlight nor the book spend a lot of time worrying about sexual orientation; Affenlight doesn’t have a sudden realization that he’s actually gay and didn’t know it until now. He’s just a man who historically loved women and now loves another man. It’s a very queer—and honest, I think—way to do it.

    It’s not just queers, Moby Dick, and baseball, though. In fact, there’s a fifth character, Affenlight’s daughter, who comes home to live with her dad after splitting up with her husband. In her (and in the other characters, too) you see one of the book’s other main themes: how to be an adult in the world; how to find something to do that gives meaning to your life. Eerily, this, too, seemed like it had been written just for me. Of course, that’s what good books do—they say something, whatever it is, that speaks directly to you, or for you. The Art of Fielding hooked me very easily, just at the premise; but I’m confident that, because it’s a good book, you don’t have to be a queer 20-something Moby Dick and baseball fan to enjoy it.

    (in occasione della segnalazione su FN de L’arte di vivere in difesa, di Chad Harbach, Rizzoli 2012)

     
  12. ■ infn ■ → #Harbach (4) #LGBTQ

    booksandpixels:

    I swear it’s the last post about Harbach for today. This is for all Italian speakers so excuse me but I’ll switch to my mother tongue for a second.

    Domenica Repubblica ha pubblicato un’intervista all’autore dove si parla di baseball, di letteratura e dei prossimi progetti editoriali di Chad: date un’occhiata…

    Copyright La Repubblica

    (in occasione della segnalazione su FN de L’arte di vivere in difesa, di Chad Harbach, Rizzoli 2012)

     
  13. ■ infn ■ → #Harbach (3) #LGBTQ

    electrickirby:

    Book Review: The Art of Fielding by Chad Harbach

    Rating: 4/5

    My friend Emily described The Art of Fielding as “fiction-y fiction,” which is pretty dead-on. It’s a big and meaty good old-fashioned novel about college, baseball and the Midwest. But before you stifle a yawn, it’s also about sexual identity, clinical depression, pain pill addiction and Steve Blass disease (a real phenomenon that’s super crazy— look it up). 

    I’m a sucker for quarter-life crisis stories, and this is a good one. Chad Harbach really captures that directionless fear that comes after realizing that the life plan you were so sure about actually isn’t going to work out after all. He presents the mini-meltdowns of confused 21 to 24-year-olds in a realistic and thoughtful way, without an overdose of melodrama. Furthermore, he wrote a novel with countless baseball-as-a-symbol-for-Life commentaries, and somehow managed to NOT make it the most cliched, hackneyed thing ever. Amazing. 

    “Schwartz, for his part, had vowed long ago not to become one of those pathetic ex-jocks who considered high school and college the best days of their lives. Life was long, unless you died, and he didn’t intend to spend the next sixty years talking about the last twenty-two. That was why he didn’t want to go into coaching, though everyone at Westish, especially the coaches, expected him to. He already knew he could coach. All you had to do was look at each of your players and ask yourself: What story does this guy wish someone would tell him about himself? And then you told the guy that story. You told it with a hint of doom. You included his flaws. You emphasized the obstacles that could prevent him from succeeding. That was what made the story epic: the player, the hero, had to suffer mightily en route to his final triumph. Schwartz knew that people loved to suffer, as long as the suffering made sense. Everybody suffered. The key was to choose the form of your suffering. Most people couldn’t do this alone; they needed a coach. A good coach made you suffer in a way that suited you. A bad coach made everyone suffer in the same way, and so was more like a torturer.”

    (in occasione della segnalazione su FN de L’arte di vivere in difesa, di Chad Harbach, Rizzoli 2012)

     
  14. ■ infn ■ → #Harbach (2)

    laviecharmee:

    Is there anything in the world as good as a brand new hardcover? (Taken with instagram)

    (in occasione della segnalazione su FN de L’arte di vivere in difesa, di Chad Harbach, Rizzoli 2012)

    (via laviecharmee-deactivated2013011)